Saturday, September 16, 2017

Paramount Fortunes (Apothecary Part III)

Continuing our journey into the Apothecary Chest, we now approach section two.  It isn’t obvious from external appearances, but when you explore the chest you will find that certain drawers don’t move or release, initially.  In order to advance you must solve the drawers presented in parts I (Topless Box and Dad’s Two Cents) and II (Ferris Box and Blocks Away) because they contain elements of the chest which are needed in order to release future drawers.  This insight is presented in the instruction manual, so is not a spoiler, lest anyone be worried that I’ve now ruined things for when they get their very own Apothecary Chest.

Parameter Motion by Kelly Snache

On the top row we discover a drawer from our old friend Kelly Snache, the part Native American spiritual guide of the puzzle world.  His “Parameter Motion” box slides out and we have a nice looking, smooth wooden box which is likely made out of repurposed wood.  Kel’s philosophy has always been to reuse, renew and recycle for the benefit of our planet, and much of his work reflects that philosophy.  The box has a few nicely detailed accents and two drawers which must be opened.  There appears to be something moving inside but you are left with few clues.  Maybe the title is a hint?  Hmm, a rule or limit which defines the boundaries of an operation.  Kel’s boxes often function through clever hidden internal locking mechanism, and this one is true to form.  It’s simple and elegant once you see how it works, but may not be so easy to open until you understand it.  Accessing the first drawer allows you to then unlock the second, and waiting inside is another hidden object which may be the key to another puzzle … but that’s all I’ll say about it right now.

12 Mile Limit c. 1930

Setting parameters for the solution got me thinking about a different set of parameters for solutions, of the cocktail variety.  An interesting fact about the moment in history when alcohol was illegal in the United States known as Prohibition is how it influenced the current definition of international territorial waters.  At that time, a three mile limit surrounding the coast was the accepted standard, having to do with the range of a cannon shot.  Beyond this it became perfectly legal to consume alcohol.  Gambling boats set up shop around the coast three miles out and happily served booze to the customers.  The US government and IRS soon discovered these goings on and promptly extended the distance for prohibition to twelve miles, and a famous prohibition era cocktail was born out of spite.  The “Twelve Mile Limit” is a boozy masterpiece meant to ridicule the very law for which it was named.  Twelve miles is now the standard for territorial waters around the globe, and regardless, international spirits are once again welcome right here on dry land. 

Reversal of Fortune by Jeffrey Aurand

The end of Prohibition in 1933 was a highly celebrated reversal of fortune for many in the United States.  Here we have another, the Reversal of Fortune puzzle box by our friend Jeffrey Aurand, a collector and hobbyist woodworker who hails from upstate New York and who hosts the legendary Rochester Puzzle Picnic each year.  Jeff’s contribution to the chest is one of the best examples of a classic Japanese style puzzle box with a serious and unique twist.  It features a beautiful top panel of shimmering patterned wood with a contrasting border and dark wood exterior.  Exploration of the box reveals some movements here or there, sometimes in unexpected ways, but there doesn’t seem to be a way to get it to actually open.  With patience and perseverance you may experience a reversal of fortune and discover why this is such a fantastic puzzle.  The solution is unique, surprising and very satisfying.  It makes you hope that Jeff will decide to design and produce more of his great ideas in the future, which would indeed be fortunate.

Royal Fortune by Joshua Washburn

For the Reversal of Fortune I’m toasting my good fortune in having the opportunity to experience the Apothecary Chest and all of its fine puzzles with more good fortune - in fact, with “Royal Fortune”.  This bold and funky riff on the Manhattan from Atlanta bartender Josh Washburn evokes the West Indian spice trade and leaves Manhattan far behind.  One might even imagine all the exotic flavors and spices being shipped across the ocean inside an apothecary like chest full of drawers.  In the original recipe, Washburn uses Denizen Merchant, a special French and Jamaican rum blend created by master distiller Nick Pelis to recreate the original rum that Trader Vic Bergeron used in his classic Mai Tai.  I’ve used Hamilton’s Demerera rum which is not at all the same but still worked well.  I also swapped Ramazotti amaro for Ciociaro, a common and acceptable substitute. The drink is rich, layered, complex and rewarding – a suitable, royal compliment to this fine puzzle box.
Here’s to widening our parameters in life, and reversing all our misfortunes.  Cheers!

Twelve Mile Limit circa 1930

1 oz White Rum
1/2 oz Rye Whiskey
1/2 oz Brandy
1/2 oz Pomegranate Grenadine
1/2 oz Fresh Lemon Juice

Shake all ingredients together with ice and strain into a favorite glass.  Garnish with a symbol of expansive universal goodwill.

I'd be happy to work within these parameters

Royal Fortune by Josh Washburn

1/2 oz Galliano
1/2 oz Amaro Ciociaro
1/2 oz Denizen Merchant
1/2 oz Neisson rhum agricole
1 oz Verdelho Madeira
Laphroaig 10 rinse
3 dashes Angostura bitters

Shake ingredients together with ice and strain into the Laphroaig rinsed glass.  Garnish with a fortune cookie lime wedge.

This is quite a fortunate pair

For more about Robert Yarger:

For the prior Apothecary Chest puzzles see:

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